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countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
couldn't breathe at points because of excitement and shock. >> the source was edward snowden. >> the nsa specifically targets the communications of everyone. it ingests them by default. it collects them in it's system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them. >> up to that point, the director of national intelligence, who oversees nearly 20 u.s. intelligence agencies, had been telling the public a different story. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. >> after the snowden revelations, clapper apologized, explaining that he'd given the "least untruthful" answer. >> i sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal email. >> so everything from learning all your metadata, with whom you're speaking, who's emailing you, where you are when you do it, how long yo
-kept secrets are out. by now, most of the world has heard the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law
of revelations by former nsa analyst, edward snowden. documents he leaked showed phone calls of millions of ordinary citizens. testimony of keith alexander and others told the committee the content is secret in a lock box unless there is a link to terrorism. that, they say, is rare. >> it would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulate suspicion that we had connection to a foreign al qaeda or related terrorist group, and look into that box. in 2002 we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white house it was a hot topic. prote press secretary jay carney said president obama assured angela merkel that there was not and will not be spying on her. >> this is what he said about france and spain. >> i have no information. >> senator dianne fienstein says she does not think it is proper for america to spy on the leaders of allied nation. the white house ordered a top to bottom review o
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that serve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intel
. a lawyer for nsa leaker edward snowden says his client found a tech support job at a russian web silt. edward snowden has been in russia since being grant asylum seekers in august. those are the headlines. "inside story" is next. >> an unusual coalition of big business groups and activists comes together to get immigration reform legislation moving. that is tonight's "inside story." hello, i'm libby casey. the capitol has been buzzing with high profile congressional hearings on nsa surveillance and the problems with the dare's rollout. in the halls of congress there's a heavy weight lobbying campaign under way to push comprehensive immigration reform. it's week applied by the chamber of commerce is forward.u.s. among others. it's a group founded by facebook's mark zuker berg. >> house democrats introduced their reform. we'll talk with congressman jeff denham, the first republican to join with democrats as a bill respond sore. >> president obama spoke to a room full of advocates at the white house on thursday in hopes of bringing the senate's im grayings bill back into the -- immigrati
. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant with the news and release of a new slide showing that the n.s.a. bypassed this system, gaining entry to yahoo and google's data centres by breaking into their fibre optic cables. u.s. citizens no longer receive protections as all the information is considered foreign. >> the real concern is the government uses the tapping of overseas cablings as a back door. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass to do what they like. >> the white house derives that authority from execu
forward. for edward snowden, it's a fate he was willing to risk. >> you live a privileged life. you're living in hawaii, in paradise, and making a ton of money. what would it take to make you leave everything behind? the greatest fear that i have regarding the outcome for america, of these disclosures, is that nothing will change. >> i think what the nsa in our nation is trying to do is protect our people and other people. you know, i would say, do you speak arabic? >> do i? no. maafi mushkila kil shi tamam, alhamdulillah. and so from my perspective, we want to have a world where there are no problems, where everything is ok, and we can say thanks. so from our perspective, we have to work together as nations to do that, and it takes intelligence and the least intrusive way we could think of was metadata. if, if anyone has any ideas how they can do it better, let us know. >> but what price are people willing to pay for security? and what could mass surveillance do to the nature of american society, and its promises of democracy, liberty and privacy? >> if you allow the government, th
spied on by there were reports of him coming from edward snowden. and then a separate report in the el mound doe newspaper indicated that some 60 million people in spain, as well as 35 world leaders. their phones being tapped. giving some rather interesting numbers that have not been disclosed before. he said that their mission began on september 11th which is a reframe that has been heard time and time again, as this debate raged on, he said that on that day, 2,996 people were killed on september 11th, but here is the part that is that public has never heard before, he said that 20 beam from the nsa have been killed fighting what is called the war on terrorism, since then, and that 6,000 people from the nsa were deployed i guess to gather intelligence. he says there has not been a mass casualty in this country since 2001, he says that is not by luck, they have not stopped trying. he also points out that they have stopped 13 incidents in the united states, another 25 incidents across europe. anyclapper also saying he believes that we have been lawful, with regards to what has been taki
information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. al jazeera, washington. >> a british man has been arrested and charged with hacking in to the computer systems of several federal agencies including nasa and the u.s. army. 28-year-old lovie love was arrested last friday at his home northeast of london he was invited in new jersey where he used a serve tore carry out the attacks. love also faces charges related to attacks in virginia it cost the government millions of dollars. >> jersey hayes begun in to the hacking scandal that brought down the news of the world in 2011. eight people, including two of the papers former editors are now on trial. rory has more now from london. >> reporter: the defendants arrived on time for their trial but the storms that hit the u.k. southeast overnight meant that not everyone could be so prompt. proceedings got underway maybe three hours late. no matter, this is likely to be one of the u.k.s longest trials in years. t
intelligence officer, edward snowden. then, the embarrassin embarrassa merkel phone tapping. barack obama is ordering a,. >> trying to get some answers. they've said that trust needs to be rebuilt. but in a few hours' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizen
the powers of the nsa and edward snowden is now. offering to help germany. >> and president obama shook hands with the leader of iraq for the first time in two years. >> secretary of state john kerry is conceding that some u.s. spying has gone too far. kerry was speaking at a conference in london. he was defending the programs but the white house has concluded that reviews and changes are needed. >> in some cases i acknowledge as does the president some of these actions have reached too far and we are going to make sure that that doesn't happen in the future. >> lawmakers on capitol hill are taking up the spying being a at this times. the senate committee has limited how long the nsa can keep their data record. records. the bill will expand penalties for illegal spying. it falls short from real reform. >> one of the critics is journalist dplejournalist glen . the more information you collect about innocent people the harder it is to actually find the people that actually mean to do you harm. and the metaphor that surveillance officals use they are hooking for a needle in the hay stack. the la
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
something that comes to mind that what we now know about spying comes from the leaks of edward snowden. >> yeah, glenn greenwald lives in rio and has all of snowden's documents. snowden is on a one-year temporary asylum and not giving any interviews. and greenwald has become the spokesperson for this. so we went down to rio. we were fortunate enough to spend a couple of days with him. and just kind of see what his life is like right now. but it's really fascinating, because when history looks back on this, greenwald will be a big part of this. >> also in your show your are going to talk about the impact on washington and what you found here in this environment was a bit of a surprise. >> it is a surprise. it cuts across the partisan lines so broodly. we interviewed allen west the former tea party representative and allen grayson who is a representative from florida in the house right now, and their views were very, very similar on this. that it's unconstitutional it lax oversight from congress, not enough is being done about it. the only people who seem to support it are people who hav
currently in the u.s. senate. >>> a growing fury after more allegations growing out of edward snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the c
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic implications of being caught. the focus worries a visiting delegation of european parliament airians investigating the scale of the u.s. program. >> spying on friends, not just on leaders, on citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was primarily about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict changes to variability of collecting data of u.s. citizens. >> more to come on al jazeera. coming home to start again. we are in the philippines town of zamboanga, where the standoff destroyed the homes of 10,000 families. and women out of work in iran. we look at the underrepresentation in the country's labour force. stay with us. >>> welcome back. a recap of the top stories - another senior leader of the muslim brotherhood has been arrested in egypt. the pictures are said to show esam el-arian when tak
eavesdropped on their voicemails. >>> edward snowden could earn a ticket out of russia if we agrees to testify about the u.s. and its spying. german lawmakers are investigating reports that the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone, and they said they would grant snowden asylum if he would be their star witness. >>> the case of a little girl named maria living in a greek roman community, has thrust the roma people back into the spot light. claudio lavanga has the story. >> reporter: miriana halilovic likes to welcome guests with coffee, but she is forced to serve it outdoors. inside the trailer she calls home there is barely space for her new-born twins. she hopes to be relocated to a social public housing are quickly fading away. >> reporter: they say i'm roma is for italian. but i'm an italian citizen too. i have a right to a decent home. >> reporter: she is one of more than 4,000 members of the roma community who live in overcrowded camps infested by rats. bouts of hepatitis a and other diseases, the air is filled with the smell of burning rubbish. this camp was built to house 600 people,
. a report in the "the washington post" cited documents leaked from edward snowden. the latest comes as a delegation from the yurp een -- european parliament visits washingtoning to -- washington to investigate claims on spying. >> the damage for the united states is so high, something has to be done on that. i hope it will be successful. we need messages for the people that without any purpose it can't happen on citizens. >> earlier this year a 16-year-old girl was gank raped as she walked home. in a few minutes we go to kenya's capital where women's rights campaigners demand her attackers be punished. >> and in india - scenes like this scare off foreign investors. but it's time to increase the minimum wage. [ ♪ music ] >>> hello again. the top stories on al jazeera: soldiers in the democratic republic of congo have retaken the last town held by rebels. people in bunagana celebrated with troops after they flushed out the m23 fighters following an 18-month rebellion. >> a trial of two senior living leaders of the khmer rouge regime is drawing to a close. nuon chea and khieu sampha
. a report in the "the washington post" sited reports leaked by edward snowden. the latest allegations come as a delegation from the european parliament is visiting washington to investigate claims on european leaders and citizens eavesdropping. >> the damage to the united states is so high that something has to be done on that. i hope that it will be successful because we need messages for our people that it can't happen on citizens or leaders. >> in rome they want to know if the nsa has listening to phone calls at the vatican. a report says the nsa spied on the vatican and his predecessor, and listened in on cardinals. the vatican says, "we are unaware of anything on the issue. in any case we have no concerns about it." >> french president francis hollande takes on the footy clubs on thursday, proposing a 75% top rate of tax. club bosses say it will make it impossible to compete at a european level and are threatening to cancel night matches scheduled for the final week of november. >> the boston red sox are champions after crushing st louis cardinals 6-1, kath turner reports. >> the bost
the allegations, coming from information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. australia prime minister said that his government had not broken any laws. >> four palestine fighters in gaza have been killed by israeli troops. violence broke out after several israelis tanks crossed the boarder into the gaza strip. it's the latest of a series of incursions into the area. >> thailand is one step closer to passing amnesty laws that could allow the return of former prime minister thaksin shinawatra. thousands have been protesting against the draft bill and more rallies are banned. thaksin shinawatra has been in exile following corruption allegations. >> in the early morning hours of friday the thai house passed pa blankets amnesty bill,ing it the opposition party have been against. there has been protests since this was introduced back in august. the last couple of days the opposition party in front of their headquarters in bangkok called in protesters. the numbers expected to be about 10,000, and that could grow throughout the day. the passage of the bill was a surprise in the early
contractor edward snowden and said the government had not broken any laws. thailand is one step closer to passing a controversial amnesty law that could allow return of the prime minister. thousands of people are protesting against the draft bill and morae rallies are planned and we have more in bankok. >> in the early morning hours of friday the thai house passed the controversial blanket amnesty bill, something the opposition party has been strongly against and protests in the months since this was first introduced back in august and the last couple of days the opposition party in the headquarters here has been calling protesters in from the country and the numbers at 10,000 and could grow through the day on friday and the passage of the bill was a surprise on friday and supposed to take place saturday morning. there is concern with this bill that some people who have been convicted of crimes over the past decade plus will be allowed -- let out of jail and a former prime minister in exile. there is big concern of what might happen to thousands of protesters on the streets of bangkok
, along with google and red hat and dozens of others. >>> edward snowden, offering to help germany in the suspected phone tapping of merkel. giving him a letter to give to the chancellor. he called the actions of the u.s. government harmful and offered to visit germany to help in its investigation. >> >> and meantime, john kerry has acknowledged that the u.s. overstepped it's boundaries. he defended the nsa's work, and he said that it was party that the agency had gone beyond what was necessary to keep the country safe >> in some cases, i acknowledge as does the president that some of these actions have gone too far, and we'll make sure that that does not happen in the future. >> the president is going to cairo on sunday, the day before morsmore so -- >> the rising tension of the region, israeli war planes are striking on syria. >> israel is not confirming flor denying the reports, they don't usually comment on these. we have had reports of alleged israeli airstrikes in syria. one in january, and that was believed to be on a convoy carolinaing hezbollah. and in october, reports of
that that does not happen in the future. >> meanwhile edward snowden is meeting a german member of parliament in moscow yesterday and offered to help with germany's investigation. >>> now to syria where there are reports of an israeli air strike. stephanie decker has more from jerusalem. >> reporter: israel is not confirming for denying these reports. this is not unusual, never really comments opthese matters. we have had reported throughout the year of al'emed syrian strikes one happened in january, and later in the year, believed to be a missile depo again at the time the israelis didn't comment, and just recently in october reports of a strike on the syrian/lebanese border, again no reaction from the israelis. what we do know is that israel takes the threat of hezbollah very seriously. and if any weapons get transferred to any hostile group especially hezbollah, it would take action, but the official line here from israel is no comment. >>> and the man charged with trying to end the bloody war in syria is back in the country. imran khan has more. >> reporter: this is the man desperately tr
.s. ambassadors protested the military move. >>> edward snowden wants the u.s. to stop treating him like a traitor. that's a letter he sent to german chancellor angela merkel. the former nsa contractor being recruited by germany as a witness into merkel's cell phone tap. >>> rebuilding after massive wildfires is a daunting task, but scientists are working on plants after wildfires. this is a report on seeds of success. >> reporter: when a wildfires ignites containment is the first priority. record high temperatures coupled with dry weather whipped up more than a dozen wildfires in colorado this summer. but what happens once the fire is extinguished could be the difference between it fueling more wildfires or preventing them. this is a site of the june 2012 pine ridge wildfire. >> it burned about 14,000 acres in the course of a few days. one day in particular. 10,000 acres burned. >> reporter: andrea is a conservation scientist with the chicago bow tannic garden. >> one problem is invasive species, but its run of the things that helped cause or carry this wildfire further than it otherwise. >> repo
will not fall into the wrong hands. >> there'll be no clementsy for edward snowden. he's asking for leniency from the government. members of the white house denied his request. he leaked secret government documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has spied on allies. if he returns to the u.s. he faces charges of espionage. he is in russia where he was granted asylum. >> a gunman involved in the killing at los angeles international airport talked to police. he told them he acted alone, the admission coming after he was shot by officers. he killed a t.s.a. employee and injured three others. the 23-year-old is facing murder charges and the death penalty. he's in critical condition and under 24 hour armed surveillance. >> an alabama airport is being reopened after a bomb threat. officials at birmingham-shuttlesworth international airport say they found a note warning of a pom in the main terminal -- of a bomb in the main terminal and called the federal bureau of investigation. after a sweep the airport was cleared. it was up and running two hours later. a dozen flight were
to changing the retirement age. many of those recipients say they want more benefits. >> edward snowden could face a tough punishment if he ever returns to the u.s. many rejected his request for leniency. snowden was charged with espionage after leaking classified documents about the nsa surveillance program. he's currently in russia where he was granted asylum. >>> tha film about the life of nelson mandela will soon be near you. we have the nelson family reaction. >> i'm prepared to die. >> the long walk to freedom had a tough task. from nelson mandela's days as a young man committed to the struggle of racial equality. the film spares no details of his 27 years behind bars. a time that history and the film proved only made the man and his cause stronger. >> your struggle, your commitment, and your discipline has has brought me to stand before you today. >> we should remember where we come from, and that this freedom was hard, and that it was won at a very, very heavy price. >> the $35 million film documents the inner works of the family. the film marked the day in south africans went to the
has registered complaints with nsa, as well as president obama and members of congress. edward snowden said the agency broke into google and yahoo's information centers. >>> memberships of the gop are taking sides. as patty culhane shows us, an election in alabama defines the sides. >> omar gets to work, trying to define the soul of the renal party. he calls himself a true believer, his cause, teapt, the most conservative faction of the republican party. >> it will be a godly country, a country that god can look down on and say, i'm proud of this country but right now i don't think he's doing that. i don't think he's proud of the way we conducted business. >> he's campaigning outside the debate for this man candidate dean young, promising to change washington confrontation. >> i can tell you now that barack obama does not want me to go to washington because we don't have a lot in common so there won't be a lot of bipartisanship unless these guys start to come over to our way of thinking. >> bradley byrne is funded by corporation. his statements are far from liberal. >> we are sending f
advancement. so, we've created what edward snowden has called the "turnkey totalitarian state." it's not quite totalitarian yet, but all you have to do is turn the key and it would be. . >>> hello and welcome. i'm phil torres, we'll talk about innovations that will change laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. [ ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to loo
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
leaked by whistle blower edward snowden in june revealing u.s. authorities are demanding internet companies hand them user information. as long as the national security agency or the fbi are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are theirs for the searching. carefully worded denils follow from the companies, arguing that they only give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case by case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant sholling the number of sa -- showing the nsa has bypassed this, breaking into googles and yahoo!'s cables. citizens no longer receive protection awes all information is -- as all information is considered foreign. >> the government backs into the cables as a backdoor to get around the complaints. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that do exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are not a citizen, if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass do what they like. >> the white house derives the authority from ex
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
and four others wounded in the attack. >> edward snowden's plea for clementsy has been denied by the white house and congress. he made the plea in a letter. white house where are said edward snowden should return to the u.s. and face charges for allegedly leaking classified information. >> secretary of state john kerry's visit to the middle east - his stop in cairo was his first visit to egypt since mohamed morsi was deposed. john kerry insisted the withholding of aid to the military is not punishment. we discussed it earlier with military experts. >> he's trying to appeal to the public opinion. >> in egypt? >> in egypt, not the u.s. in egypt, after what happened last june or july, asking president mohamed morsi and the american reaction towards what happened, which a lot of egyptians thought was hostile and inappropriate. they thought the american government was siding with the muslim brotherhood. it created uneasy innocence. john kerry is trying hard to restore the image of the u.s., trying to build bridges with the egyptian government. >> should he be building a bridge with the governme
edwards snowden and a lot has changed since then, especially for the people who helped leak the information. jonathan betz has a look at that story. >> it's a global story that began in the summer with edward snowden. he is now in asylum in russia but the scandal keeps unfolding because he reported handed over almost all of his secrets to two journalists, greenwald who is based in brazil. he keeps breaking stories printed in papers all over the world, usually until countries where they will make the biggest splash. greenwald works as a columnist for the guardian. on thursday, he is leaving that british paper to help start a new journalistic venture funded by the founder of ebay. that site will likely continue revealing nsa stories. his reporting partner will join him there. she was actually the first to connecticut with snowden but works mainly behind the scenes. she is a film maker putting together a documentary about all of this and then there is julian assange. he had a minor role. nudge went to wikileaks but he did help him avoid u.s. authorities. he remained holed up in
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
on and talk about edward snowden. does he consider himself a hero as supporters do. how does he react to the anger of those who call him a traitor? >> i think he is disappointed. he doesn't consider himself a hero. i think he eschews any such label. i think he considers himself a patriot and an american and a whistleblower. and i think that's right. obviously all sorts of incendiary and inflammatory words have been thrown around, some of which don't even fit the legal definition, if people were to bother to look it up. but, no, he didn't see himself as a hero. >> one of the people attending the rally, a man named dave miller, told u.s.a. today, the national progress is more control, more power. no matter what they say, we're going down the path towardteri ttierney? do you agree? >> i think we are in the position of turnkey tierney. we are right there. we are following the playbook. >> how has it hurt anybody? >> how has it hurt anybody? the fact that all of our personal information is being stored in a big data storage facility in utah, anybody at any time who works for the nsa or any
governments should be aware that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone callings. that's european parliamentary delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the mass surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, both political and business. >> that was al jazerra reporting. also on monday the head of the senate intelligence committee, diane feinstein once a loyal supporter of the nsa broke ranks she can norankssaying she is opf collecting intelligence on u.s. allies. words of praise from president obama during a ceremony formally installing his new fbi director. he took over for a stepping down director. president obama describes him as someone who knows what is right and what is wrong. he served as a deputy attorney general during the georg
that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation and the dragnetting of that i have citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. >>> president of the philippines is questioning the authenticity of a video that appears to show hostages being shot at by the army during a siege last month. now fighting between the philippine army and the hostage takers left many dead in the southern city there. in just a moment we'll be getting the military's reaction, but first here more details. >> reporter: the maker of that online video says it shows hostages shouting at the army not to shoot. they are waving the white flag of vendor. nearby, carrying weapons are said to be national liberation front rebels. the military is believed to have opened fire. some fall while others scamper for safety. he is no stranger to armed conflict. he fought as a soldier against the mlmf which they first independents at the end of the 9060s, now the very same fighters were the ones that held him hostage. >> we are so happy because we thought a cease
. >> a wall street journal finding president obama has reached his lowest approval. >> edward snowden has a new job, a lawyer for the n.s.a. leaker said his clients found a tech support job as a are you sure website. he has been living in the former soviet republic since granted asylum in august. those are your headlines. consider this is next. we have updates 24 hours a day on i'm dell walters in new york. we'll see you at the top of the hour. >> an al jazeera america exclusive. corruptions has reached is the higheshighest level of politics. how wide spread is this conduct? we'll run it down across america. an important follow up on a story we brought you recently. interpreters who risked their lives being kept in harm's way by political red tape. >> and the hemingway curse. one of america's moist america's families has been rocked by suicides. mariel hemingway will join us. >> we begin with corruption in california. >> in this report al jazeera investigative unit will look at a sting operation launched by the fbi. >> los angeles, a city where fame and infamego hand and ha
worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f philippines. ten years old, female, philippines. we deliberately kept the camera a little bit far a
snowden' snowden's snowdd edward cameron's are are answer was this. >> i don't want to use the tougher measures. i think it's better to appeal to the social responsibility, it will be difficult for government to stand back and not to act. >> ing earlier in the houses of parliament. comments being made in spain as well today. >> the ramifications of the leaks, the nsa and the gchq are annoying governments all around the world. spain is the latest. its foreign minister has said revelations will suffer and actions will be taken on their behalf so they're clearly not happy about what's going on. >> you've had a busy day, talk about it i guess you could call it a spying scandal in the u.k, concerns media, newspapers and a hacking trial. i know you were in court earlier for that. >> yes, this has been going on for years as far as i can remember. this is a scandal which involves british newspapers and what they would do over a period of a decade, and two figures that are quite well-known in british public life, re rebecca brooks,d andy corson former editor of news of the world. they and six o
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
by aljazeera. >> edward snowden has a new job, his lawyer said he has found a tech support job. he has been living in the former soviet republic since august. the lawyer didn't name the company. he is set to start tomorrow. >> if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. you're going to get a better deal. >> president obama in boston on wednesday addressing the concerns of americans who are now getting those cancellations from their medical insurancers. he stood where mitt romney signed the massachusetts health care law seven years ago, the president saying massachusetts also had bumped along the way but it eventually became a success. while responding to the mis, mitt romney went to facebook to attack the president's health care law, writing: >> president obama actually learned the lessons of health care in massachusetts, millions more would not see their prices skyrocket and it would not have been a frustrating embarrassment. romney's remarks attracted more than 11 million likes on the networking site. >> kathleen sebelius got her chance to explain what
mundo is getting the information from edward snowden. comes from claims that president obama knew about and improved spying on angela merkel. not true. house and homeland security, says the house should stop apologizing for the nsa, and dick cheney agreed. >> important to the security of the nation and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives not only the united states but in france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk. the fact is they carried out spying operations against united states both the government and industry. >> a much different thought though from democratic senator jean sheheen. she called for the government to come clean about its surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral ription relationshipsh germany with mexico with the other countries where the suggestion is we've listened in. so i think we have repair work to do and we have hard questions we need to ask about the nsa about what is really happening in t
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